12.24.2013

'Twas the Night Before Christmas [phojo style]



Dec. 24, 2013; in my office; USA - Remembering the good ol' days. My photojournalistic twist on a classic Christmas poem. © Darrell Miho

‘Twas the night before Christmas and all through the land,
Newsrooms were buzzing with deadlines at hand.
Assignments were posted on the wall without care,
In hopes that some photos soon would be there.
The writers were typing and pecking away,
On keyboards their fingers composed what to say.
The boss with his sleeves rolled up in a bunch,
I at my desk, with a doughnut and Hawaiian punch.
Then over the scanner there came such a chatter,
I perked up my ears to hear what was the matter.
Squawking and beeping alarms over the air,
The voice from within called out in despair.
Fire trucks, paramedics, ambulance and PD,
Possible five-ten, multiple vehicles and a tree.
Streetlights were out with nary a glow,
Roads were all slick and covered with snow.
I knew in a moment, this news would be big,
I yelled, “Stop the presses!” and squealed like a pig.
A semi! A porsche! A stroller, oh no!
Tragic this is, need photos, gotta go!
Out the front door, like a bat out of hell,
I raced to the scene with cameras and cell.
Upon my arrival, I could not imagine,
All the wreckage I saw, how did this happen?
The semi was twisted and wrapped ‘round a pole,
The Porsche was blazing, hit a tree, flipped and rolled.
Stumbling around was a man dressed like St. Nick,
Who reeked of liqueur, A ha! there’s my pic!
He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot,

His clothes were all tarnished with gashes and soot;

His eyes were all teary, bloodshot and red,
His breath smelled like eggnog and vodka, ‘nuff said.
So I pressed on the shutter and snapped a few frames,
Pulled out my note pad and jotted down names.


Back to the office I returned in a hurry,
Into the darkroom, I worked in a flurry.
Turn off the lights, flip the door latch,
Pop the film canister, reel it fast, fast.
Drop in the tank and cap it real tight,
Crank up the temp and shake it left - right.
Push that film baby, one-hundred degrees,
Grain is no problem, Acufine is the key.
Developer then fixer, rinse and then loupe,
No time to dry, into the enlarger from soup.
Dodging and burning, slip it in tray,
Agitate, agitate, fix and then pray.
Potassium Ferricyanide, reveals Santa’s face,
Oh my! This is scandalous and such a disgrace.
Editor says “Yes!” so off to the printer,
Scanner and halftone, layout and waxer.
With plates made of metal in place on the drums,
Presses start rolling, the ink flow begun.
Alas it is done, the newspaper complete,
Tossed onto doorsteps while most people sleep.
This is what life was like once upon a time,
Photojournalism is dying ‘cause pics cost a dime.  

                         *
                       joy
                      love
                     peace
                          !
may every day be christmas

3.28.2012

Bonding for the Future

Minamisanriku - It has been one year since a magnitude 9.0 earthquake rocked the Tohoku region of Japan and sent a series of tidal waves that wiped out much of the northeast coast and created an ongoing nuclear crisis. In the small town of Minamisanriku, Miyagi Prefecture, more than 75% of the city was destroyed. The town was literally washed away.

More than 500 people died and over 100 are still missing. On Sunday, March 11, it was standing room only at the Bayside Arena where more than 3,000 people gathered to pay their respects to those who had perished and those who are still missing. Emperor Akihito and Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda addressed the nation at a memorial service in Tokyo that was simulcast to all the memorial services across the country.

The Emperor expressed his heartfelt gratitude to his country and to the world for their overwhelming support. “I hope that all of the people of Japan will sympathize with the disaster victims and that persistent efforts will be made to improve the situation.”

Prime Minister Noda was deeply saddened by the loss of life and vowed to do everything possible to speed up the recovery and help people return to their hometowns. “We will stand by the disaster victims during these difficult times and work together to fulfill the historic mission of reinvigorating Japan through reconstruction.”

Minamisanriku Mayor Jin Sato (above), who himself barely survived the tsunami by clinging to a broadcast antenna atop the three-story Minamisanriku town hall building and Miyagi Prefecture Governor Yoshihiro Murai also spoke at the service.

The service featured several chorales of students from the local elementary schools each singing songs they had written and ended with a presentation of flowers for all in attendance.

As I was leaving the service, someone was calling my name. I turned around to see Mitsuaki Maeda, his daughter Juri and niece Megumi. I was very happy to see them. I held back tears as Megumi showed me a picture of her mother and father who passed away in the tsunami.

When I first met Mitsuaki in June of last year, he introduced Megumi to me as his own daughter, It was only later that I learned that his brother and sister-in-law had died and he had taken on the responsibility of caring for Megumi. It is this deep commitment to family and values that keeps bringing me back to Minamisanriku.

Mitsuaki (far left) is one of the people who truly inspires me to help the people in Japan. He lost his brother, his sister-in-law, his home and his sushi restaurant. Yet, despite his tragic losses, he still wears a smile on his face and remains positive about the future.

I met him and his family for lunch the following day at their temporary housing unit. He told me that my friend Ken and I were the first people he ever met outside of Japan when we were there cooking a barbeque for the evacuation shelter he was staying at. Since then, he said that he is now learning English and watching American movies because he wants to learn more about life and cultures outside of Japan.

Kizuna is the Japanese word that describes the bond and emotional ties between people. Since the triple disaster, it has become more widely used as more people create those bonds by working together to rebuild their lives and their communities.

During these past few days, several people have told me that they really appreciate it when people come to visit them. It’s not the donations or the money that are important to them. It’s the relationships with others that raises their spirits. It is my hope that these bonds, the spirit behind kizuna, will last forever.

2.02.2012

Have a Heart, Buy Some Art!

please feel free to share this with a friend...or two or 100...

the MIHO gallery
is now open!
http://darrellmiho.photoshelter.com/

i have chosen a few select photos from my travels to Hawai'i and Japan as well as a series of flowers. prices vary depending on the size and type. some are limited edition prints (signed and numbered : more expensive) that are ready for hanging while others are mounted and ready for framing.

so for the month of February, i am kicking of the grand opening with the "Have a Heart, Buy Some Art!" campaign to help raise money for a few long term projects i have been working on. it's a sweetheart of a deal for family and friends. you'll automatically get 20% off and 33% of your purchase will be tax deductible and will go towards making this world a better place.

to place an oder:
go to the MIHO gallery
click on limited edition prints and fine art prints.
find the perfect photo(s) for your wall(s).
click on "add to cart" to see the different sizes available and prices.
write the name/number of the photo and pick a size/price.
click on contact and email that information to me.
do not purchase the photo through the website. you won't get the discount or the tax deduction.

the final prints will not have any of the text on them. it is merely a security feature built into the website so that people don't steal my photos. yes, unfortunately, people do do that.

to order your print(s) or for more information, please send me a message by clicking here or on the contact button on the MIHO gallery site.

here are the projects you can support...

Project Hibakusha : Hope for Peace
in partnership with the American Society of Hiroshima-Nagasaki A-Bomb Survivors (ASA)
i am documenting stories from atomic bomb survivors to archive their stories and to create a traveling exhibit to promote world peace. i have over 100 survivors signed up from South Korea, Japan, Canada, Brazil and the US.

Ai Love Japan
in partnership with Pacific Film Currents
my friend Ken and I are documenting stories of tsunami survivors in Tohoku Japan to share with people in the US to encourage people to do more and give more. and in the process, we are learning about the community needs and raising money to provide direct aid to help them rebuild their lives.

the Garrett Miho Foundation
We assist children of single parent households so that children can continue to have access to activities and programs that provide life experience, leadership skills, interpersonal relationships and build self esteem. we are now supporting children in Japan who lost one or both parents in the tsunami.

thank you very much for your support...together, we can make this world a better place.

1.26.2012

why our prices are "WACK"...


i read on the Sportsshooter message board about a bride to be in Seattle, WA who posted an ad on Craigslist searching for a wedding photographer and she was appalled at the rates photographers were charging. in her words, they were "WACK" for charging so much.

here is her ad in its entirety...

WHY is finding an amazing wedding photographer so difficult? :/

I am a Bride who is getting married this summer and have yet to find a decently priced, exceptional, amazingly talented, fun photographer.

WHY because the word "WEDDING" is involved photographers think they can change you $ 3,000.00 for wedding photos? Oh, because no bride is going to go without so they are going to pay it, because they HAVE to. They are ripping people off for all they have! Why when you want to get married it costs you AT LEAST 15 grand after all is said-and-done? Its such CRAP!! I love all you $ 3,000.00 photographers out there but i think your prices are WACK. All your doing is hanging out at a wedding taking tons of photos and editing them.. and thats owrth 3 GRAND!!! You're making so much money its crazy. I just wish people would be more realistic. I mean the "average" persons salary for 1 freaking month is somewhere around 3 grand. (Thats making 19$ an hour) So you're going to take someones WHOLE MONTH paycheck for one flippen day of photos? Just because you CAN!!?????? So that maybe they will not be able to feed themselves or pay any other bills they have, right? It makes me SICK!

I know im speaking for more than just myself right now. Alot of brides out there think the same thing. & I bet all you fancy photographers wont even read this. oh-well.
Maybe there are cheaper photographers that will read this and LOVE to take my photos :)
~ ~ ~ end of ad ~ ~ ~


i'm not surprised that some people feel this way. i've heard it a few times myself. so i couldn't help but respond to her ad to try and explain to her why good wedding photographers charge $3,000 (or more) to shoot a wedding.

this is what i emailed to her...

dear puget sound bride...
i am sorry you are having a difficult time finding a photographer for your wedding.

but there is a reason why some photographers charge $3,000 (or more) to shoot a wedding. and if you really think about it, there is a reason why you haven't hired the $1,000 photographer...you don't like their work.

so, aside from the obvious fact that talent cost money, there is more to it than just 'hanging out at a wedding taking tons of photos and editing them'.

most likely that $3,000 photographer has an assistant and/or a second photographer. i don't do a wedding without one simply because i can not be everywhere. having a second photographer provides a different perspective of the same event, thus giving you more photos. if your photographer is not providing a second shooter, hire a different photographer or be prepared to be disappointed.
cost - $300 - 700

plus the cost of prints
cost - $200 - 400

outside of the wedding day, we will meet with you at least twice, once prior to the wedding and once after the wedding. sometimes more depending on the circumstances.
approx. 3 - 5 hours

if we haven't shot at your wedding site, we'll also go scout out the location(s) to see what the lighting is like and to figure out where to shoot your formal photos and group photos.
approx. 1 - 2 hours

we will also go to your wedding rehearsal to get an idea of what your ceremony will be like. at least i do. i don't like surprises.
approx. 2 hours

you are also paying for experience. we are prepared for just about anything. the more weddings a photographer has done, the more he knows what to be prepared for and what to do when a crisis occurs. like buying the bride a martini (or beverage of choice) when she's stressed out about the limo driver being late. or having bobbie pins or spare buttons ready. i carry a 'bride and groom' kit with band aids, towel wipes, thread needle, tissue, mirror, lighter, swiss army knife, pins and clips of all sizes and a myriad of other little things that may come in handy.
cost - priceless

when we are not shooting or editing or meeting with you, as business owners, we also need to take care of our business. we need to do our bookkeeping, our marketing, our equipment maintenance. yes, you pay for part of this because these are parts of the cost of doing business and part of the money we earn needs to cover the time to do these things. our work is more than just the wedding day and editing.

on top of that, we also have to pay our own medical insurance, equipment insurance and liability insurance, which might be something you might not realize if your employer provides this for you. this is also the cost of doing business.
cost - $500 - $800/month

as a professional photographer that only does photography for a living, there are three reasons that i can think of that a wedding photographer would charge less than $1500 for a whole day wedding...
1. he/she has a full time job and does it on the side for extra income. thus eliminating the need for a steady livable income or having to pay for their own medical insurance...and i forgot to mention, retirement planning.
2. he/she can't command that much money because their photos are not worthy of that rate, and therefore, can not be a full-time photographer.
3. he/she doesn't understand completely the value of their work or the cost of doing business and will either quickly learn to adapt or go broke trying.

so, yes, good photography cost money and unfortunately, this is what has happened with the advent of the digital revolution. because there are no film and processing costs, people have begun to believe that photography has gotten cheaper, but the reality is that it has not.

i spend more time at my computer now because of it. i also need to upgrade my cameras and computer every 3 years. in the film days, i shot with the same cameras for 15 years and didn't even need a computer except for invoicing and bookkeeping.

so i hope that i have added a little insight into why some photographers charge $3,000. it's not that we are trying to rip you off (ok, some might be because some aren't worth that much). but honestly this is what it costs to run a photography business successfully.

but i do wish you luck finding a 'decently priced, exceptional, amazingly talented, fun photographer.' while 'fun' should be included, 'decently priced' and 'exceptional' and 'amazingly talented' are usually mutually exclusive terms not typically found describing the same thing.

it's not impossible...but in the end, that old saying 'you get what you pay for' usually applies, so choose wisely. you don't get a second chance. there are no do-overs.

and a little advice, you might want to change your ad so you don't sound like a disrespectful, demanding bride. while this is your day and it IS all about you, having a bad (yet honest) attitude about what we do for a living is not going to win over any self-respecting photographer. any photographer, regardless of their rate, is not going to want to work for someone who belittles their profession.

respectfully yours,

an amazingly talented photographer (but not cheap)
~ ~ ~ end response ~ ~ ~

photographers, please feel free to forward this any time you feel the need to. it is unfortunate that some people feel this way, but sometimes we need to inform the misinformed.

if you want to read a couple of more responses, read these:
Nikki Wagner
Kristen Booth

10.27.2011

going back to Japan...

Ai Love Japan, is continuing to provide direct aid to the people affected by the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis in Japan. we have already cooked a BBQ for them, provided them with some clothes and with the help from some wonderful people in Kaua'i, provided over 850 pairs of slippers for people in Ishinomaki, Kesennuma and Minamisanriku. mahalo to Godwin and Local Slippers.

we will be going back to Japan November 10-24 to follow up with the people we have already met to see how they are adjusting to life in temporary housing units and to see what new needs the evacuees have.

we will continue to interview survivors and bring back more survivor stories, but our main mission is to provide jackets and warm clothing for the coming winter months.

if you would like to support the evacuees, we can now accept tax deductible donations via cash, check, visa, master card, american express, discover and paypal.





to see a list of needs and for more information on how you can help, please visit our Give page on our website.

on behalf of the people of Japan, arigatou gozaimashita!

8.20.2011

Kuniko Suzuki's tsunami ride

[NOTE: If you would like to help the people of Japan, please visit the Ai Love Japan website to see how we are now providing direct aid to the people in the hardest hit areas of Fukushima, Iwate and Miyagi Prefectures.]

On the afternoon of March 11, 2011, 73-year old Kuniko Suzuki was inside her home folding laundry and talking with her neighbors, Nobuko Kasuya and Megumi Chiba, who stopped by to visit.
2011年3月11日の午後。73歳の鈴木都子さんは自宅で洗濯物をたたみながら、遊びにやってきた隣人のかすやのぶこさん、ちばめぐみさんと話していた。

At 2:46pm, the house began to shake when a magnitude 9.0 earthquake jolted the Tohoku region of Northeastern Japan, knocking out power and causing major damage to roads, buildings and infrastructure. She went outside to check to see if her grandchildren were coming home.
午後2時46分。家が揺れ始めた。マグニチュード9.0の地震が東北地方を襲ったのだ。この地震はのちに停電を引き起こし、道路や建物、そしてインフラが壊滅的な打撃を受けた。鈴木さんは孫たちが学校からの帰路についているかどうかを確かめるために外に出た。

Soon after, the tsunami warning sounded and she was conflicted with what she should do. Wait for her grandchildren or evacuate to higher ground? She decided to evacuate because the week before they had a smaller earthquake and she remembered that the teachers kept the students at the school. She had faith that the school would take care of her grandchildren.
その直後、津波警報が耳に飛び込んできた。だが、彼女はどう行動すればいいのか迷った。孫の帰宅を待つべきか、あるいは高台へ逃げるべきか…彼女はひとりで避難することを選択した。一週間前に小さな地震があったとき、孫たちが通う学校では生徒たちをその場に一時待機させたのを思い出したからだ。

She called inside to Kasuya and Chiba who were busy cleaning the doll case that had fallen off the shelf. She told them “There’s no time for cleaning. A tsunami is coming. Let’s get out of here. ”Because of arthritis in her leg, Suzuki didn’t get around easily, so she couldn’t take the shortcut and had to go the long way.
鈴木さんは、棚から落下した人形ケースをいそいそと片付けているかすやさんとちばさんに呼びかけた。「そんなことをしている場合じゃない…津波がやって来るわ!すぐに避難しなければ!」。とはいえ、足の関節炎を患う鈴木さんは簡単に動き回ることができない。抜け道を歩くことができない彼女は、周り道をしなければならなかった。

There are several videos on YouTube taken from an evacuation area on a hillside above the small town of Minamisanriku. You can see entire homes floating and a cloud of dust filling the sky as the tsunami demolished everything in its path. At one point, you can see Suzuki and other residents emerge from between the houses as the floodwaters approached. “I heard crazy noises from behind while I was running. I didn’t turn around.” she said.
ここ南三陸の小さな町の丘の上にある避難場所。ここで撮影された動画がYoutubeにいくつかアップされている。そこには、津波がその進路上にあるすべてを破壊するかたわらで、濁流に浮かぶ家や空を埋め尽くす砂煙が撮影されている。その中には、押し寄せる洪水を背に、民家の間を抜けて避難する鈴木さんや住人たちの姿を確認することができる。「逃げているとき、背後で恐ろしい音がしたのです。私は振り向きませんでした」

In one video, she says she can hear her daughter-in-law screaming, “Mother, run!” In another video, you can see the tsunami waters rush in behind her and then she disappears out of frame. What happened next only she can describe.
ある動画の中では「お母さん、早く逃げて!」、と叫ぶ鈴木さんの義理の娘の声が聞こえるという。また別の動画では、鈴木さんの背後に津波の激流が迫り、彼女が画面から消えてしまうのがわかる。その後で何が起こったのかは鈴木さんにしかわからない。

“The wave was very big and the wave scooped me up. The waves came from both sides and crossed and made a big tall wave. I was riding on it.” Despite being swept up by the floodwaters, she said she wasn’t scared and remained pretty calm. “I can swim very well,” she said.
「巨大な津波がやって来て、私はその波に飲まれてしまったのです。両側から迫って来る波は、交差してさらにとんでもなく大きな波になりました。私はその波に乗る格好になったのです」。激流に流されたのにもかかわらず、彼女は怯えることもなくかなり落ちついていたと言う。「泳ぐのは得意だから」、そう彼女は言った。

“The force of the tsunami was very strong. It happened so fast. [I] rode the wave when the wave hit this area,” pointing to a pile of debris 50 yards away with her cane, “it just happened in a second. Then the roof came down.”
「津波はかなりの威力を持っていました。発生したのはあっと言う間です。私が波に乗るかっこうになったのは、津波がこの辺りに迫ってきたときです」。そう言った鈴木さんは、50ヤード先にあるがれきの山を杖で指した。「津波は瞬く間に起こり、そして家から屋根が落ちてきました」

That roof she spoke of was floating in the floodwaters and became her life raft as it came underneath her and scooped her up and carried her to an embankment, 50 yards from where we were standing during the interview. That is where a firefighter plucked her off the roof to safety.
水の中に投げ出されたその屋根は、鈴木さんの救命ボートになった。彼女の体の下に潜った屋根が、現在インタビューをしている場所から50ヤード先の堤防まで彼女を運んだのだ。そして堤防に流れ着いた彼女は、消防団の手によって安全な場所へと救出された。

In the roiling sea of debris, it’s a miracle she wasn’t hurt. Not a scratch. The only blemish on her was a bruise on her arm where the firefighter grabbed her.
水の中にはがれきがうごめていたにもかかわらず鈴木さんは無傷だった。これはまさに奇跡だ。彼女はかすり傷1つ負わなかったのだ。消防団に助け出されるときに腕にできたあざが、彼女の負った唯一の外傷だ。

After she was rescued, she said she sat down on the steps that lead up to the Shizugawa High School, which currently serves as an evacuation center where she and her husband had lived for 4 months. She remembers looking out at the water and seeing houses “drifting like the leaves in the water...like bamboo leaf ships.”
彼女は志津川高校へとつながる階段へと救出された。そこが現在、彼女と彼女の夫が4か月暮らしている避難所だ。激流とそれに流される家を目にしたときのことを彼女はこうふりかえる。「建物が水の中を葉っぱのように漂流していたんです。まるで笹の葉船のように…」

Her life now is like those houses, drifting, with no final destination in sight. “I am wondering what is going to happen from now. You can’t build the houses where the tsunami hit. So we don’t have the land, and no aid from the government. I am very worried about my future. There is no plan from the local government.”
現在の彼女の生活は、あのとき目にした建物に似ている。最終的な目的地が見えないのだ。「これからいったいどうなってしまうのか…津波に襲われた場所に家を建てることはできません。つまり、私たちは土地を失ったということです。それに政府の援助もありません。この先のことが本当に心配です。自治体の計画もまだ固まっていないのですから…」

But she remains optimistic about the future. “Even though I am living in a mountain of debris, I have a strong spirit to go through this. I have to do something. I have to live. I don’t want to die like this. If there is a chance, I would like to build a house again.”
とはいえ、彼女は今後について前向きでもある。「がれきの山の中で生活していても、私にはこの困難を切り抜けてやるんだという強い意思があります。なんとかしなければならない。生きなくてはならない。こんなことで死にたくはない。チャンスがあれば、もう一度、家を建てたいです」

For now, she is just grateful that all of her family members are safe. Building a new house will have to wait while the government comes up with a plan for rebuilding the town of Minamisanriku.
今、彼女は家族全員が無事だったことに何よりも感謝している。南三陸町の再建に向けた計画を政府が打ち立てるまで、新しい住宅を建てることはできない。

But they are a step closer now, she and her husband won the lottery – the temporary housing lottery. Last week, they moved into a two-bedroom temporary housing unit along with five other family members. “It’s small, and it’s not like our own house, but it’s far better than staying at the emergency shelter.”
だが、一歩前進した。鈴木さんご夫妻は仮設住宅の抽選に当選したのだ。先月、彼らは他の5世帯とともに、2つの部屋がある住宅へと入居した。「ここは狭くて、これまでに住んでいた家とは比べ物にならないけれど、避難所で暮らすよりははるかにましです」