10.27.2011

going back to Japan...

Ai Love Japan, is continuing to provide direct aid to the people affected by the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis in Japan. we have already cooked a BBQ for them, provided them with some clothes and with the help from some wonderful people in Kaua'i, provided over 850 pairs of slippers for people in Ishinomaki, Kesennuma and Minamisanriku. mahalo to Godwin and Local Slippers.

we will be going back to Japan November 10-24 to follow up with the people we have already met to see how they are adjusting to life in temporary housing units and to see what new needs the evacuees have.

we will continue to interview survivors and bring back more survivor stories, but our main mission is to provide jackets and warm clothing for the coming winter months.

if you would like to support the evacuees, we can now accept tax deductible donations via cash, check, visa, master card, american express, discover and paypal.





to see a list of needs and for more information on how you can help, please visit our Give page on our website.

on behalf of the people of Japan, arigatou gozaimashita!

8.20.2011

Kuniko Suzuki's tsunami ride

[NOTE: If you would like to help the people of Japan, please visit the Ai Love Japan website to see how we are now providing direct aid to the people in the hardest hit areas of Fukushima, Iwate and Miyagi Prefectures.]

On the afternoon of March 11, 2011, 73-year old Kuniko Suzuki was inside her home folding laundry and talking with her neighbors, Nobuko Kasuya and Megumi Chiba, who stopped by to visit.
2011年3月11日の午後。73歳の鈴木都子さんは自宅で洗濯物をたたみながら、遊びにやってきた隣人のかすやのぶこさん、ちばめぐみさんと話していた。

At 2:46pm, the house began to shake when a magnitude 9.0 earthquake jolted the Tohoku region of Northeastern Japan, knocking out power and causing major damage to roads, buildings and infrastructure. She went outside to check to see if her grandchildren were coming home.
午後2時46分。家が揺れ始めた。マグニチュード9.0の地震が東北地方を襲ったのだ。この地震はのちに停電を引き起こし、道路や建物、そしてインフラが壊滅的な打撃を受けた。鈴木さんは孫たちが学校からの帰路についているかどうかを確かめるために外に出た。

Soon after, the tsunami warning sounded and she was conflicted with what she should do. Wait for her grandchildren or evacuate to higher ground? She decided to evacuate because the week before they had a smaller earthquake and she remembered that the teachers kept the students at the school. She had faith that the school would take care of her grandchildren.
その直後、津波警報が耳に飛び込んできた。だが、彼女はどう行動すればいいのか迷った。孫の帰宅を待つべきか、あるいは高台へ逃げるべきか…彼女はひとりで避難することを選択した。一週間前に小さな地震があったとき、孫たちが通う学校では生徒たちをその場に一時待機させたのを思い出したからだ。

She called inside to Kasuya and Chiba who were busy cleaning the doll case that had fallen off the shelf. She told them “There’s no time for cleaning. A tsunami is coming. Let’s get out of here. ”Because of arthritis in her leg, Suzuki didn’t get around easily, so she couldn’t take the shortcut and had to go the long way.
鈴木さんは、棚から落下した人形ケースをいそいそと片付けているかすやさんとちばさんに呼びかけた。「そんなことをしている場合じゃない…津波がやって来るわ!すぐに避難しなければ!」。とはいえ、足の関節炎を患う鈴木さんは簡単に動き回ることができない。抜け道を歩くことができない彼女は、周り道をしなければならなかった。

There are several videos on YouTube taken from an evacuation area on a hillside above the small town of Minamisanriku. You can see entire homes floating and a cloud of dust filling the sky as the tsunami demolished everything in its path. At one point, you can see Suzuki and other residents emerge from between the houses as the floodwaters approached. “I heard crazy noises from behind while I was running. I didn’t turn around.” she said.
ここ南三陸の小さな町の丘の上にある避難場所。ここで撮影された動画がYoutubeにいくつかアップされている。そこには、津波がその進路上にあるすべてを破壊するかたわらで、濁流に浮かぶ家や空を埋め尽くす砂煙が撮影されている。その中には、押し寄せる洪水を背に、民家の間を抜けて避難する鈴木さんや住人たちの姿を確認することができる。「逃げているとき、背後で恐ろしい音がしたのです。私は振り向きませんでした」

In one video, she says she can hear her daughter-in-law screaming, “Mother, run!” In another video, you can see the tsunami waters rush in behind her and then she disappears out of frame. What happened next only she can describe.
ある動画の中では「お母さん、早く逃げて!」、と叫ぶ鈴木さんの義理の娘の声が聞こえるという。また別の動画では、鈴木さんの背後に津波の激流が迫り、彼女が画面から消えてしまうのがわかる。その後で何が起こったのかは鈴木さんにしかわからない。

“The wave was very big and the wave scooped me up. The waves came from both sides and crossed and made a big tall wave. I was riding on it.” Despite being swept up by the floodwaters, she said she wasn’t scared and remained pretty calm. “I can swim very well,” she said.
「巨大な津波がやって来て、私はその波に飲まれてしまったのです。両側から迫って来る波は、交差してさらにとんでもなく大きな波になりました。私はその波に乗る格好になったのです」。激流に流されたのにもかかわらず、彼女は怯えることもなくかなり落ちついていたと言う。「泳ぐのは得意だから」、そう彼女は言った。

“The force of the tsunami was very strong. It happened so fast. [I] rode the wave when the wave hit this area,” pointing to a pile of debris 50 yards away with her cane, “it just happened in a second. Then the roof came down.”
「津波はかなりの威力を持っていました。発生したのはあっと言う間です。私が波に乗るかっこうになったのは、津波がこの辺りに迫ってきたときです」。そう言った鈴木さんは、50ヤード先にあるがれきの山を杖で指した。「津波は瞬く間に起こり、そして家から屋根が落ちてきました」

That roof she spoke of was floating in the floodwaters and became her life raft as it came underneath her and scooped her up and carried her to an embankment, 50 yards from where we were standing during the interview. That is where a firefighter plucked her off the roof to safety.
水の中に投げ出されたその屋根は、鈴木さんの救命ボートになった。彼女の体の下に潜った屋根が、現在インタビューをしている場所から50ヤード先の堤防まで彼女を運んだのだ。そして堤防に流れ着いた彼女は、消防団の手によって安全な場所へと救出された。

In the roiling sea of debris, it’s a miracle she wasn’t hurt. Not a scratch. The only blemish on her was a bruise on her arm where the firefighter grabbed her.
水の中にはがれきがうごめていたにもかかわらず鈴木さんは無傷だった。これはまさに奇跡だ。彼女はかすり傷1つ負わなかったのだ。消防団に助け出されるときに腕にできたあざが、彼女の負った唯一の外傷だ。

After she was rescued, she said she sat down on the steps that lead up to the Shizugawa High School, which currently serves as an evacuation center where she and her husband had lived for 4 months. She remembers looking out at the water and seeing houses “drifting like the leaves in the water...like bamboo leaf ships.”
彼女は志津川高校へとつながる階段へと救出された。そこが現在、彼女と彼女の夫が4か月暮らしている避難所だ。激流とそれに流される家を目にしたときのことを彼女はこうふりかえる。「建物が水の中を葉っぱのように漂流していたんです。まるで笹の葉船のように…」

Her life now is like those houses, drifting, with no final destination in sight. “I am wondering what is going to happen from now. You can’t build the houses where the tsunami hit. So we don’t have the land, and no aid from the government. I am very worried about my future. There is no plan from the local government.”
現在の彼女の生活は、あのとき目にした建物に似ている。最終的な目的地が見えないのだ。「これからいったいどうなってしまうのか…津波に襲われた場所に家を建てることはできません。つまり、私たちは土地を失ったということです。それに政府の援助もありません。この先のことが本当に心配です。自治体の計画もまだ固まっていないのですから…」

But she remains optimistic about the future. “Even though I am living in a mountain of debris, I have a strong spirit to go through this. I have to do something. I have to live. I don’t want to die like this. If there is a chance, I would like to build a house again.”
とはいえ、彼女は今後について前向きでもある。「がれきの山の中で生活していても、私にはこの困難を切り抜けてやるんだという強い意思があります。なんとかしなければならない。生きなくてはならない。こんなことで死にたくはない。チャンスがあれば、もう一度、家を建てたいです」

For now, she is just grateful that all of her family members are safe. Building a new house will have to wait while the government comes up with a plan for rebuilding the town of Minamisanriku.
今、彼女は家族全員が無事だったことに何よりも感謝している。南三陸町の再建に向けた計画を政府が打ち立てるまで、新しい住宅を建てることはできない。

But they are a step closer now, she and her husband won the lottery – the temporary housing lottery. Last week, they moved into a two-bedroom temporary housing unit along with five other family members. “It’s small, and it’s not like our own house, but it’s far better than staying at the emergency shelter.”
だが、一歩前進した。鈴木さんご夫妻は仮設住宅の抽選に当選したのだ。先月、彼らは他の5世帯とともに、2つの部屋がある住宅へと入居した。「ここは狭くて、これまでに住んでいた家とは比べ物にならないけれど、避難所で暮らすよりははるかにましです」

7.04.2011

A day at the Shizugawa High School evacuation center in Minamisanriku.

南三陸町、志津川高校避難所での1日

[NOTE: If you would like to help the people of Japan, please visit the Ai Love Japan website to see how we are now providing direct aid to the people in the hardest hit areas of Fukushima, Iwate and Miyagi Prefectures.]

May 18, 2011; Minamisanriku, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan – It’s 4:50 in the morning and golden rays of sunshine are already streaming through the glass block windows at the Shizugawa High School Judo Dojo. The sound of rustling blankets can be heard coming from one corner while sounds of snoring emanate from all around. The sliding metal door opens and closes as early risers tend to their morning business.
日本北東部にある宮城県、南三陸町—時刻は現在、午前4時50分。志津川高校の柔道場にはめ込まれたガラスレンガの窓からは、すでに黄金に輝く太陽の光が射し込んでいる。道場のあちこちで轟くいびきをバックに、どこかから毛布の擦れ合う音が聞こえてくる。金属製の引き戸が開き、そして閉まった。早起きの人の朝はすでに始まっているようだ。

There is no running water. Six portable toilets are lined up outside the dojo – three for women and three for men. A five gallon (20-liter) plastic jug with a spout and a plastic bowl serve as a temporary sink. Soap, hand sanitizer, paper towels and a wastebasket sit next to the jug of water. Cleanliness is of the utmost importance to prevent the spread of germs and diseases.
ここには蛇口から出てくる水はない。柔道場の外には、女性用と男性用が3つずつ、計6つの簡易トイレが並んでいるが、その脇に設置されたプラスチック製の水がめが、仮設の流し台に5ガロン(約20リットル)の水を供給しているのだ。そこに並んでいるのは、石鹸、殺菌用のハンドローション、ペーパータオル、そしてゴミ箱だ。黴菌や病気の蔓延を予防するには、なんと言っても清潔なことが重要だ。

At 5:30 a.m., Jun Suzuki is standing outside the entrance of the dojo wearing a pair of burgundy sweat pants and a long-sleeved black t-shirt under his black surfboard aloha shirt. While he takes his morning smoke, two ladies walk by and they greet each other with a softly spoken “Ohayou gozaimasu.” It’s a friendly exchange between fellow evacuees.
午前5時30分。道場の入り口の前に1人の男性が立っている。えんじ色のスエットパンツに黒の長袖シャツ、その上に黒のアロハシャツを引っかけているこの人の名は鈴木 淳さんという。朝の一服をする彼の前を2人の女性が通りがかった。すれ違いざま、彼らは静かに「おはようございます」、と挨拶を交わした。そこには同じ避難者としての仲間意識がたしかに存在する。

The morning is brisk as a new day begins at one of the 41 evacuation centers set up in Minamisanriku after the March 11, magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami struck northeastern Japan and nearly wiped out this small fishing port in the Miyagi Prefecture.
3月11日、マグニチュード9.0の地震と津波が日本の北東部を襲い、宮城県に位置するこの小さな港町もほぼ壊滅状態となった。そんな南三陸町には41か所の避難所設けられているが、その1つであるこの避難所の1日の始まりには、まだ寒気が肌を刺す。

Suzuki is one of 105 residents at the Shizugawa High School Evacuation Center that sits on a hill above the town where his house once stood just over 12 weeks ago. Most of the residents here escaped with only the clothes on their back. Some, like Suzuki, are just lucky to be alive.
鈴木さんは志津川高校避難所で生活する105人の避難者の1人だ。この避難所はほんの3か月前まで彼の家があった町を見下ろす高台にある。ここにいる避難者のほとんどは、あの惨禍から着の身着のままで逃げてきた。鈴木さんのように死を免れた人々は、ただただ幸運なのである。

At 5:50 a.m., Suzuki walks across the soccer field and down two flights of stairs to the Tokubetsu Yogo Homu Jikein, a special nursing home for the elderly, where he and his parents fled after they saw the tsunami engulfing their hometown. Inside, he walks down a dark, debris littered hallway and leads us into the room where they were trapped by the tsunami floodwaters.
午前5時50分。鈴木さんはサッカー場を通り抜けて階段を下りた。向かった先は特別養護ホーム「慈恵園」だ。特別な老人介護施設であるこの建物には彼の両親が身を寄せている。彼らは自分たちの町が津波に飲み込まれるのを見て、ここへ避難してきたのだという。建物の中に足を踏み入れると、そこは瓦礫の散乱した暗い廊下だ。その先には、災害当日に津波がもたらした洪水によって、彼らが閉じ込められてしまった部屋がある。

Over two months later, you can still see the brown waterline just below the ceiling indicating just how close they were to drowning. There was only a foot of air space left to breath. He reaches up towards a metal curtain rod and explains how he hoisted himself up to keep his head above the water. “I thought I was going to die,” he said. If the water kept rising for another few minutes, he and his parents probably would have joined the list of over 14,000 people confirmed dead or missing in the Miyagi Prefecture alone.
2か月が過ぎた今となっても、部屋の天井から数センチのところに茶色に変色した水の跡が見てとれる。彼らがいつ溺れてもおかしくなかったことは一目瞭然だ。呼吸が許されたのは、足の大きさ程度の幅のわずかなスペースしかない。鈴木さんはカーテンレールに手を伸ばすと、水面から顔を出そうとあがいていた状況について語り出した。「死ぬんだと思った」、そう彼は言った。死亡者や行方不明者の数は宮城県だけで14,000人にものぼっている。あと数分の間、水かさが増し続けていれば、彼の名も彼の両親の名も、その名簿に加わっていただろう。

Suzuki’s story is just one of the many survival stories to be heard from evacuees who now live in 2559 shelters located throughout Japan. While their lives have all changed forever, the residents try to move forward and return back to as much of a normal life as one could possibly have under the circumstances.
鈴木さんの話は、日本にある2559か所の避難所で暮らす多くの避難者か体験したことの1つにすぎない。生活はすっかり変わってしまったものの、彼らは前を向き、そしてこの状況の中で最大限の「普通の生活」を取り戻そうとしている。

At 7:00 a.m., the school children are all dressed in uniform and board shuttle buses bound for schools in Iwanuma, 30 minutes away. The parents who still have jobs, go to work just as before. Others do chores around the shelter. The elderly go for walks or sit around drinking tea, eating sembei and talking with their new neighbors on the other side of the three-foot high, 1/8-inch thick cardboard wall that separates them. This is their new life living in an evacuation center.
午前7時。制服を着た子どもたちが30分離れた岩沼にある学校へ向かうため、スクールバスへと乗り込んだ。今もなお仕事を持っている親たちは、以前と同じように仕事へと向かう。一方、残された人たちは避難所での雑用を片付ける。お年寄りは散歩に出かけたり、お茶を飲んだり、せんべいを食べたりとさまざまだ。なかには、高さ3フィート(約1メートル)、厚さ8分の1インチ(約3ミリ)の段ボールで隔てられた「隣人」と会話している人たちもいる。

There is very little privacy. As you walk through the shelter, you can see inside each family’s living space. You can see who’s neat and who’s messy. One family made a door that opens and closes. Another made a sliding door held by a clothes clamp. Blankets are neatly stacked against the cardboard walls.
ここにはプライバシーなどほとんど存在しない。歩いていると、それぞれの家族の生活スペースが丸見えだ。誰が綺麗好きで誰が散らかし放題なのかは簡単に見てとれる。ある家庭には、開閉する扉がしつらえられていた。また、積み上げた洋服を支えにして引き戸を設置している家庭もある。段ボールの壁の脇には、毛布がきれいに積み重ねられている。

There are 40 families living in the roughly 3000 square foot dojo. None of the cardboard cubicles is more than 70 square feet. Despite the cramped quarters, there have been no conflicts. Everyone has adapted well to their new living conditions. Everyone understands each other’s plight. This is their new community.
およそ3000平方フィート(約170帖)の道場には40世帯の家族が暮らしている。段ボールの家はすべてが4帖以下だ。だが、たとえどんなに窮屈な状況でも、もめ事は起こっていないという。誰もが新しい環境にうまく自分たちを順応させている。大変なのが自分たちだけではないことを皆が理解している。そう、これが彼らの新しいコミュニティーなのだ。

At noon, lunch is served for the few residents who remain at the dojo during the day. There is a full kitchen they can use to prepare family style meals in large metal pots and bowls. Today, they are having packaged onigiri (rice balls), takikomi gohan (mixed rice) and miso soup.
正午。日中を道場で過ごすわずかな人に昼食が配られる。器具のそろった厨房で作られるのは、大きな鍋やボウルに入ったセルフサービス方式の料理だ。フィルムでラップされたおにぎりと炊き込みご飯、そして味噌汁が今日の献立だ。

After lunch, some residents walk upstairs to browse through the free market. Residents can pick up every day items like diapers, soap and clothing as well as books, toys and school supplies free of charge.
昼食を終えたあと、数人の避難者が階上にある配給所へと向かった。そこではおむつや石鹸や衣類といった日用品、さらには本やおもちゃ、そして学用品が無料で支給されている。

Outside, final touches are being completed on the newly constructed temporary housing units. The protective fencing is being removed and asphalt was being finished and sealed, but the units will remain uninhabitable for the near future. There is still no running water in many parts of Minamisanriku. The water supply is still contaminated from the tsunami that flattened this quiet town nestled between the hills of cedar trees and the Pacific Ocean.
近隣では仮設住宅の建設が最終段階に入っていた。防護フェンスが外され、アスファルトの舗装工事も完了しようとしている。だが、避難者が仮設住宅に入居できるのはまだ先である。南三陸町の多くの地域で、まだ水道が復旧していないからだ。スギの木が生い茂る太平洋岸のこの静かな町を破壊した津波…その影響で水道水はまだ汚染されたままなのである。

Wet clothes dance on the clothesline in the afternoon breeze while another load of laundry is agitating in the washing machine. Nearby, Sena Sato, 4, and Ruka Sato, 5, each play with a hula-hoop.
物干しざおに掛けられた衣類が午後のそよ風に揺れている。第二便の洗濯物は洗剤の泡にまみれながら、洗濯機が仕事を終えるのを待っている。すぐそこでは、5歳のさとるかちゃんと4歳のせなちゃんの姉妹がフラフープで遊んでいた。

At 2:30 in the afternoon, Japanese Self-Defense Forces from Okinawa, who are stationed at the high school, off load cases of dried kitsuden udon into the school’s gym which serves as a warehouse for supplies. Shortly after, they carry jugs of hot water to be used for an evening bath.
午後2時30分。この避難所に駐留する沖縄の自衛隊員が、供給品の倉庫となっている学校の体育館に、インスタントのきつねうどんが入った段ボール箱を運び込んだ。彼らが次にトラックから降ろしたのは、風呂に使う湯の入った容器だった。

A group of dentists arrive at the shelter to inspect the dentures of some of the residents. Doctors and counselors make regular visits to ensure everyone’s physical and mental well-being. Volunteers do everything from cleaning the portable toilets, taking the elderly to run errands and playing with the children.
数名の歯医者が避難所にやって来た。避難者の入れ歯をチェックするためだ。また、避難者の心身の健康を確保するために、医師やカウンセラーも定期的に避難所を訪れている。さらにボランティアの人々は、簡易トイレの掃除からお年寄りの雑用の付き添い、そして子どもの遊び相手まで何でもこなす。

At 5:30, dinner is served. Evacuees line up and pile styrofoam bowls of rice, cucumber salad, watermelon and packaged onigiri onto makeshift plastic and cardboard trays and shuffle back to their living areas to eat with their family. Suzuki hands beer to those of legal drinking age. One resident smiles and slides two cans into her apron pockets. It’s not fine dining, but there is enough for everyone.
午後5時30分、夕食。列を作る避難者が、白米やキュウリのサラダ、スイカの入った発砲スチロール製の皿やおにぎりをプラスチックや段ボールの手製のお盆に乗せ、家族と一緒に食事をするために「家」へと戻る。鈴木さんは、飲酒年齢に達している避難者たちに缶ビールを配っていた。1人の避難者がいたずらな笑みを浮かべながら、エプロンのポケットに2本のビールを滑り込ませた…すべての避難者に行き渡る食糧は確保されている。無論、決して豪勢な食事とは言えない。

After dinner, students head upstairs to a small room with square modular shelving on each side and a table in the middle. Five students are crammed into the 60 square foot space to study with no computers and no internet.
夕食後、5人の学生たちが階上にある小さな部屋へと向かった。部屋の両サイドには四角い組み立て式の本棚が設置され、中央にはテーブルが置かれている。コンピューターもインターネットもない4帖ほどのスペースで、彼らは肩をぶつけ合いながら勉強をするのだ。

Just steps outside, some other students are treated to a special lesson in the multi-purpose room, equipped with folding chairs and tables. On one side, folded ping pong tables separate it from more living spaces. Empty supply boxes are stacked to create two more walls. On this particular night, a few soldiers from Japan’s Self-Defense Forces are teaching the kids Sanshin, an Okinawan style of the shamisen.
そのすぐ隣の多目的ルームでは、数人の学生のために特別な体験教室が開かれていた。折り畳みのイスとテーブルを備えるこの部屋の片側には折り畳み式の卓球台があり、それがこの階にある避難者の住居スペースとの間仕切りとして機能している。そしてさらに2つの壁が、空になった段ボール箱を積み重ねて作られていた。今夜、数人の自衛隊員が子どもたちに教えているのは、三味線に似た沖縄の楽器の三線だ。

At 9:00 p.m., it’s lights out. The sound of rustling blankets and snoring returns to the dojo as solar powered portable lights illuminate the walkways. Most of the residents call it a night. Some sit outside, smoking a cigarette and talking amongst each other.
午後9時、消灯。ソーラー式のポータブルライトが通路をぼんやりと照らすなか、いびきと毛布の擦れ合う音が再び道場に戻って来た。ほとんどの人はすでに床の中だ。だが、屋外でタバコを吸ったり、話をする避難者もいる。

The future is unknown for these evacuees. Many are not sure if they can stay. Government officials have yet to make a decision on whether or not the residents can rebuild in the tsunami zone or if they must relocate. For Suzuki, Minamisanriku is his home. “I wish I can stay in my hometown.” he said, “This is where I was born.”
避難者の明日は見えない。この地に留まれるかどうか、わからない人がたくさんいる。津波に襲われた地域に家を建て直せるようにするのか、あるいは引っ越しを強制するのか、政府の判断はまだ下されていないのだ。鈴木さんにとっての家は南三陸町しかない。彼は言った。「他へは行きたくない…ここはぼくが生まれた町なのだから」

5.26.2011

earthquake and tsunami aftermath : Minamisanriku

地震と津波が残した爪痕:南三陸町にて

[NOTE: If you would like to help the people of Japan, please visit the Ai Love Japan website to see how we are now providing direct aid to the people in the hardest hit areas of Fukushima, Iwate and Miyagi Prefectures.]

i just returned from Japan working on Project Hibakusha : Hope for Peace and afterwards, my good friend Matsui-san and i spent a few days in the Tohoku region documenting the damage and ongoing relief efforts after the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami devastated the Northeast coast of Japan on March 11, 2011.
日本からちょうど帰国した。日本へは被爆者プロジェクト「平和への願い」の活動の一環で訪れたが、帰国前に親友の松井さんとともに数日間を東北地方で過ごすことにした。2011年3月11日、日本の東北沖を襲ったマグニチュード9.0の地震、そしてそれに伴う津波がもたらした被害と現在も続く救援活動を記録するためだ。

we didn't go to as many places as i wanted, but quality has always been more important than quantity. we met some wonderful people with some amazing survival stories.
想定していたほどの場所を訪れることはできなかった。だが、やはり重要なのは量より質だ。ぼくたちは素晴らしい人々に出会い、そしてこの惨事からの生還にまつわる生の話を聞くことができた。

in Minamisanriku, Miyagi Prefecture, the devastation is unbelievable. with the exception of a handful of concrete and steel-framed buildings, anything below 50-feet (15m) above sea level is gone, washed away by the tsunami. the only thing left are the foundations and the debris. for the handful of buildings still standing, there is nothing left inside except broken dreams.
宮城県, 南三陸町の惨状は我が目を疑うものだった。コンクリートや鉄筋の建物がわずかに残っているだけで、海抜15メートル以下にあったものはすべて津波に流されてしまっている。目の前にあるのは建物の基礎とがれきだけ。流されなかった建物も、その内部はがらんどうだ。そう、残っているのは破壊されてしまった夢だけだ…

a quarter-mile (400m) inland, a car sits on top of three story apartment building.
海から400メートルの内陸部。3階建てのマンションの屋上に車が流れついている。

inside, the apartments were gutted by the flood waters.
すべてが津波で流されたマンションの内部

3/4 of a mile (1.2km) inland, a 30-foot (9m) fishing boat sits amongst a pile of splintered wood and debris in the shadows of houses that were essentially left untouched.
海から1.2kmほどの内陸部。砕けた木片やがれきの山にうずもれる長さ9メートルの漁船。後ろには難を逃れた数件の家が見える。

but the real stories are those of the survivors. meet Mr. and Mrs. Suzuki. they are currently staying at the Shizugawa High School evacuation center in Minamisanriku. what you see in this photo is ALL they have and ALL of it was donated. there is nothing left of their house. they literally survived with only the clothes on their backs.
だが、事実はもっと壮絶だ。ぼくたちは、この惨事から生還された鈴木さんご夫妻に出会った。現在、おふたりは南三陸町にある志津川高校避難所で生活されている。彼らの持ち物はこの写真に写っているものだけで、すべては寄付されたものだという。家には何1つ残っておらず、文字通り、2人は着の身着のままでこの災難を切り抜けたのだ。

but despite the loss of all of their possessions, Mrs. Suzuki says that they have all that they need. everyone in her house, her husband, daughter, son, daughter-in-law and two grandchildren all survived. there are other families who aren't so lucky. they even invited me, my friend and interpreter to join them for dinner in their new cardboard "home".
「家のなかのものはすべて流されてしまった。だけど本当に必要なものは失っていない」、そう夫人は口にした。夫、娘、息子、義理の娘、そして2人の孫…彼女の家族はみな無事だったのだ。実際、もっと不運だった人々はたくさん存在する。ご夫妻は段ボール製の「自宅」での夕食の席にぼくたちを招待してくれた。

it is this undying unselfishness and optimism that makes me want to go back and do more for these people. her survival story itself is a miracle.
ご夫妻のとどまるところのない無欲さと前向きな姿勢に、ぼくの気持ちは駆り立てられた。もう一度、被災地に戻って被災者の方々のためになることをしたい…実に、鈴木夫人の話は奇跡的なものだった。

she was standing outside of her home waiting for her grandchildren to come home from school when the tsunami warning sounded. her husband was at a party on the third floor of one of the few buildings left standing just a stone's throw away from the ocean.
津波警報が発令されたとき、夫人は家の前で孫たちが学校から帰って来るのを待っていた。一方、ご主人は海のすぐ近くにありながら流されることのなかった数少ない建物の3階で宴会に出席していたという。

Mrs. Suzuki, with a bad leg, headed to higher ground but couldn't escape the rush of the tsunami floodwaters. miraculously, a house floated underneath her and lifted her above the water level. the house was carried to an embankment where firefighters plucked her safely off the roof of the house.
高台へ逃れようとしたものの、足の悪い夫人は津波によって押し寄せてくる水を避けることができなかった。ところが奇跡的に、水中を流れてきた1軒の家が彼女の体を水の上へと押し上げた。その後、家は堤防へと流れつき、屋根にいた夫人は消防隊に救助された。

Mr. Suzuki evacuated to the 4th floor where he and the other party goers also survived. Mr. and Mrs. Suzuki were reunited the following day after Mr. Suzuki walked over an hour through debris towards the high school which sits on a hill that overlooks the town, a walk that normally would have taken ten minutes.
ご主人は宴会が催されていた建物の4階へと避難し、他の参加者とともに難を逃れた。そして翌日、ご夫妻は再会を果たした。ご主人は1時間以上かけてがれきの中を歩き、町を見下ろす丘の上にある高校へとたどり着いた。通常ならわずか10分の道のりだという。

it is for Mr. and Mrs. Suzuki and all of the other people in the devastated areas that i am doing what i can to help the people in Japan. it is for people like them that i hope that we can continue to do positive things for those who have suffered so much loss and yet are grateful for what they have.
鈴木さんご夫妻をはじめ、被災地にいるすべての被災者の方々のために、日本でできる限りのことをしたい。多くのものを失いながらも、手の中にあるものに感謝している人々が元気になれるよう、さまざまな活動に取り組んでいきたい…心からそう願ってやみません。

if you have ideas on how to help, please feel free to leave a comment. i hope that we can all remember the Suzuki's as we continue to find ways to support the people of Japan.
どうすれば被災者の方々の力になれるのか、なにかアイデアがあればぜひコメントを投稿してください。スズキさんご夫妻のお話をいつも胸に留めながら、日本の人々を応援する方法を模索できればと思っています。

if you would like to make a donation, please contact me
and send me your email address and i will forward you a list of organizations that i know are doing great things for the people in Japan.
寄付にご協力くださる場合は、メールアドレス
をお知らせください。被災地にいる人々のためにすばらしい活動をしている組織の一覧をお送りします。

please share this with your friends, family, colleagues and the world. the more people that hear these stories, the more people we can get to help. together, we can make a difference.
この情報を友達やご家族、そして世界中の人々に知らせてください。より多くの人がこうした話を耳にすることで、より多くの人を助けられるようになるはずです。力を合わせれば絶対に乗り越えられるに違いない.

issho ni gambarou!!!
一緒にがんばろう!